Presidential Candidates' Confederate Records
Instructions:

For some issues, to explain the Neo-Confederate or Confederate aspect of it, or provide additional information, the NOTES section at the end will have numbered notes to which the individual candidate entries will refer. Additionally, there will be a GENERAL REFERENCE section for information relevant to the Presidential campaign and the Confederacy. To navigate to these sections click on the links to them in these Instructions.

In summary the sections are DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS, THIRD PARTIES, NOTES, and GENERAL REFERENCES.

DEMOCRATS

Biden, Joseph R.: U.S. Senator from Delaware

Has declared that he is running for President in 2008.

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General2001 : (See Note 1) Voted against Ashcroft confirmation in both Senate Judiciary Committee vote and U.S. Senate vote.

2. Voted against the extension of the Patent for the United Daughters of the Confederacy, both the first and second votes. (See Note 2).

3. Story about Biden thinking he is going to do well in the Southern Democratic primaries since he is from a slave state. The exact quote is, from Fox News Transcripts:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,210668,00.html

WALLACE: And, finally, Senator Biden finally, we've got about 30 seconds left, but I can't let you go without some politics. As we've mentioned, you're in South Carolina right now, on the campaign trial. Thirty seconds or less, what kind of a chance would a Northeastern liberal like Joe Biden stand in the South if you were running in Democratic primaries against southerners like Mark Warner and John Edwards.

BIDEN: Better than anybody else. You don't know my state. My state was a slave state. My state is a border state. My state has the eighth-largest black population in the country. My state is anything from a Northeast liberal state.

WALLACE: So you think you could go into the lion's den and against the other lion tamers?

BIDEN: I know I can.

WALLACE: Senator Biden, we're going to have to leave it there. We want to thank you so much for joining us today.

BIDEN: Thanks.

These are a couple links to commentary on the story.

http://www.delmarvanow.com/deweybeach/stories/20060830/2323783.html

http://www.al.com/opinion/huntsvilletimes/index.ssf?/base/opinion/115710226799230.xml&coll=1

4. Biden goes for the Confederate vote as reported in this story.

As reported in "The State" concerning Biden's campaigning in South Carolina, Nov. 28, 2006, Jim Davenport, Associated Press. http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/local/16117154.htm


"He's not shy about talking about South Carolina's Confederate history either.

After a club member noted an upcoming event at the state Department of Archives and History included a chance to see the state's original copy of the Articles of Secession, Biden asked: "Where else could I go to a Rotary Club where (for a) Christmas Party the highlight is looking at the Articles?"

Biden noted Delaware was a border state and "a slave state that fought beside the North. That's only because we couldn't figure out how to get to the South - there were a couple of other states in the way."

The crowd roared with laughter.

Evidently Biden is campaigning for the Confederate Vote. Two more links to the same story.

http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061129/NEWS/611290400/1050&template=currents

http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/16117154.htm

5. Biden has come out against the Confederate flag and has been the target of a Neo-Confederate protest.

http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/16465466.htm
 

The above article reports on Neo-Confederate protest against the NAACP MLK event at the State house protesting against U.S. Senator and 2008 Presidential candidate Biden.

We can expect to see a lot of this in the upcoming 2008 presidential campaign. However, I think most Democratic presidential candidates will be disappointed if they don't get a protest against them by Neo-Confederates. A Neo-Confederate protest would be an image booster for a candidate hoping to attract Democratic voters across the country.

The question is, whether the Neo-Confederates will be disruptive. That is, will they pull down signs and posters, and harass campaign workers and operations. I don't know if they will or will not. I think it is possible.

It seems Biden is dropping his "slave state" Delaware identity.

6. Sons of Confederate Veterans in their publication Southern Mercury alert their readers that Biden is against the Confederate Flag on statehouse grounds in an article, "Say What?????,"  Southern Mercury, Vol. 5 No. 2 April 2007, page 23.

Clinton, Hillary: U.S. Senator from New York

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted against Ashcroft confirmation.

2. Clinton calls for the removal of the Confederate Flag from the South Carolina Statehouse grounds. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/19/AR2007021900655.html

3. Since Bill Clinton has become an integral part of Hillary Clinton's campaign, I am including his record in this guide. It is in Note 4 in the Note section at the bottom of this web page. It has the text of his three letters of congratulations to the United Daughters of the Confederacy. I wrote Bill Clinton a letter asking him to retract his endorsements and congratulations to the UDC, but got no reply. The text of the letter is also Note 4.

Another item after all the information about the UDC, I have a short note about Bill Clinton putting a wreath on the Confederate Monument in Arlington Cemetery.

4. Sons of Confederate Veterans in their publication Southern Mercury alert their readers that Hillary Clinton is against the Confederate Flag on statehouse grounds in an article, "Say What?????,"  Southern Mercury, Vol. 5 No. 2 April 2007, page 23.

 

Dodd, Christopher: U.S. Senator from Connecticut

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted for Ashcroft confirmation.

2. Voted against the extension of the Patent for the United Daughters of the Confederacy, both the first and second votes. (See Note 2).

3. U.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., called for the removal of the Confederate flag that flies at the South Carolina Statehouse as he attended a Martin Luther King Jr. memorial event at a Greenville church Sunday night (1/14/07).  http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/politics/elections/16461179.htm

4. Sons of Confederate Veterans in their publication Southern Mercury alert their readers that Dodd is against the Confederate Flag on statehouse grounds in an article, "Say What?????,"  Southern Mercury, Vol. 5 No. 2 April 2007, page 23.

 

 

Edwards, John: Former U.S. Senator from North Carolina

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted Against Ashcroft confirmation.

2. . Condemned by the Sons of Confederate Veterans for his stance on the Confederate flag by name. http://www.scv.org/press/scvpr08.htm (This page has evidently been removed. However, you can visit the archived page at the Wayback machine. http://web.archive.org/web/20041214023750/http://www.scv.org/press/scvpr08.htm.

The Neo-Confederates really don't like John Edwards. Since he is of the South, they see him as a traitor because he doesn't support Neo-Confederacy.

3. The following are items from the 2004 election regarding John Edwards. The links are probably not working.

1. Voted against John Ashcroft's confirmation as Attorney General  in the general Senate vote. 

2. Voted the first and second time against renewing the Design Patent of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

3. Associated Press Worldstream, Jan. 17, 2003.

"Kerry said this week: 'I credit the people of South Carolina who reasoned together and took the flag down from the dome. I hope it will be removed from the Capitol grounds as well.'" 

4. Associated Press State & Local Wire, Feb. 2, 2003.

"Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry says he respects a compromise by the state legislature that took the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome to the capitol's grounds, but he said he would rather see the flag in a museum.

Kerry, who is one of the five official candidates in what will be a crowded Democratic presidential primary next February, said Sunday, he respects Confederate soldiers, but can't respect they were fighting to destroy his country. 

'I fought under the flag of the United States of America. We all live under the flag of the United States of America,' the Vietnam Veteran said. 'That's the flag that belongs in the public places of display.' The Confederate flag 'belongs in a museum and belongs in private homes or elsewhere,' Kerry said."

5. Voted against Gale Norton's conformation as Secretary of the Interior. 

6. From an online article, Joy-Ann Reid, NBC.net, July 15, 2003. You can find this at other news sites, but this site had the most complete quote. 

"Kerry also blasted Bush's record as a "compassionate conservative," saying it was time for a Democrat to replace a president "who would do a 15-minute drive-by stop at Goree Island (in Senegal) but (who) is willing to go to South Carolina and play Jefferson Davis on the Confederate flag."

7. John Kerry's website's official comment on Dean's comments regarding Confederate flags. On the web page is the following.

Statement from John Kerry on Howard Dean's Confederate flag statement

"I still want to be the candidate for guys with Confederate flags in their pickup trucks," Howard Dean said Friday in a telephone interview from New Hampshire. [Des Moines Register, 11/1/03]

November  01,  2003

"Howard Dean is justifying his pandering to the NRA by saying his opposition to an assault weapons ban allows him to pander to lovers of the Confederate flag.  It is simply unconscionable for Howard Dean to embrace the most racially divisive symbol in America.  I would rather be the candidate of the NAACP than the NRA."

Dean's Flip-Flopping on the Confederate Flag

Dean "declined to say South Carolina should stop flying a Confederate flag, again saying that is a state decision." [Knight Ridder, 2/2/03]

Dean has conceded previously that there are "a very significant number of folks in this state to whom it is a symbol of oppression and slavery." [Washington Post, 2/5/03]

8. http://www.scv.org/news/press/scvpr08.htm Press release by the Sons of Confederate Veterans condemning Kerry amongst others.

9. John Edward's has more comments on Howard Dean's comments.
Sunday, November 2, 2003
Statement By Edwards In Response To Dean's Comments On Southern Voters
ALGONA, IA - Senator John Edwards (NC) released the following statement in response to Governor Dean's remarks on southern voters:

I have lived for fifty years in the South. And the working men and women, white and African-American, Governor Dean speaks of are my family, my neighbors, my classmates, the people who fought together for equality and dignity in every part of their lives. What Governor Dean may not understand, is what the Confederate flag means to us in terms of oppression and too often violence. If we embrace those who display the flag for the purpose of heralding that oppression, because we think they share some economic common ground with us, we then fail to share the moral common ground with the Southern Democrats, white and African-American, who have been the core of the Southern Democratic Party.

10. http://www.scv.org/news/press/scvpr08.htm Press release by the Sons of Confederate Veterans condemning Howard Dean amongst others.

11. Council of Conservative Citizens attacks John Edwards at their webpage.

Council of Conservative Citizens attacked John Edwards on their website. John Edwards face is front and center on the main page of the website with the headlines, "Edwards to Southern Whites: Get Lost!", with a link to the CofCC article attacking him at http://www.cofcc.org/news.htm.

The article leads with:

On his campaign dash across South Carolina, John Edwards has kissed, hugged, and glad-handed his way through enthusiastic throngs of gyrating blacks. Like all liberal Democrats, Edwards is convinced that black votes are essential for the Democratic presidential nomination. Black voters, most political pundits agree, decide elections in the South.

The CofCC seeks to get revenge against Edwards saying:

One political pollster noted that elections in South Carolina are decided by several thousand swing voters. These same voters ousted two governors for disrespecting the Confederate flag. Edwards will be no different

 

 

Kerry, John: U.S. Senator from Massachusetts -- Not a candidate.

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted against Ashcroft confirmation.

2. Voted against the extension of the Patent for the United Daughters of the Confederacy, both the first and second votes. (See Note 2).

3. Condemned by the Sons of Confederate Veterans for his stance on the Confederate flag by name. http://www.scv.org/press/scvpr08.htm (This page has evidently been removed. However, you can visit the archived page at the Wayback machine. http://web.archive.org/web/20041214023750/http://www.scv.org/press/scvpr08.htm.

 

Kucinich, Dennis: Former mayor of Cleveland, Ohio, currently member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

1. Was a co-sponsor of H.R. 35, a resolution against the Council of Conservative Citizens. 

2. Kucinich is not sleeping in South Carolina while campaigning to honor the boycott regarding the Confederate flag. So he is against the Confederate flag flying on the statehouse grounds. This is reported by the Charlotte Observer as a short item on their web page, Jan. 29, 2004. I just haven't gotten much coverage on where he stands on this. I didn't find any information on his website in the beginning.

Obama, Barack: U.S. Senator from Illinois

1. Article about Obama objecting to Confederate flag being flown in Illinois. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4155/is_20051003/ai_n15811407 from the Chicago Sun-Times, Oct. 3, 2005.

2. League of the South view of Obama: http://leagueofthesouth.net/rebellion/index.php/search/results/1fe3bd89354e67420cc89594c6e62f8c/

 

Richardson, Bill : Governor of New Mexico

1. http://www.boston.com/news/local/new_hampshire/articles/2007/01/15/dodd_calls_for_removal_of_confederate_flag_in_south_carolina/

Richardson refuses to answer questions about his position on the Confederate flag.

2. Richardson decides the Confederate flag on the South Carolina state grounds isn't a good idea.

http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/55887.html

 

 

 

REPUBLICANS

 

Brownback, Sam: U.S. Senator from Kansas

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted for Ashcroft confirmation both in the Senate Judiciary Committee and in the U.S. Senate vote.

Giuliani, Rudolph, former mayor of New York City

1. Rudolph Giuliani campaigned for Haley Barbour despite his openly working with the Council of Conservative Citizens www.cofcc.org . Derrick Z. Jackson eidtorialized about the entire matter in a column of which the link to follows:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2003/10/22/barbours_racist_links_tar_bush_too/

2. Takes position that Confederate flag is a state's rights issue.

These are some articles on Rudy Giuliani and his position relating to the Confederate flag.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/11/us/politics/11rudy.html?ref=politics

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/fn/4703442.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,,-6547495,00.html

Giuliani feels it should be left to the states. He side steps the issue of what the Confederate flag means or that it is a symbol of white supremacy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr8LOLcuQPI

3. Giuliani's campaign manager, Arthur Ravenal Jr.,  in South Carolina has a Neo-Confederate record.

This is a Congressional Record entry for Ravenal Jr. and also a link to an article about Ravenal.

Max Bluementhal has this article on Yahoo from Nation magazine.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/thenation/20070628/cm_thenation/45209093

Arthur Ravenal, who is heading Giuliani's campaign, had a speech defending secession in the Congressional Record, June 25, 1991. It was reprinted in the Vol. 11, 2nd Quarter 1991 issue of Southern Partisan, page 10.

This is the Congressional Record entry for the 102nd Congress:

SUPPORT FOR SECESSIONISTS (House of Representatives - June 25, 1991)

[Page: H4950]

(Mr. RAVENEL asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute.)

Mr. RAVENEL. Mr. Speaker, I know that those who win the wars write the histories. However, I must take exception to a remark made by Mr. Solarz last week wherein he said,
Abraham Lincoln made the point that once the Southern States joined the Union, they were part of it permanently.

The fact was and still is that no constitutional prohibition of secession exists. Faced with this dilemma, Mr. Lincoln provoked the infant Confederacy into foolishly attacking Fort Sumter. He then declared the departing States to be in rebellion and called for 75,000 volunteers to suppress it. North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Virginia refused the call and joined their southern sisters. I join those who applaud todays secessions in the Soviet Union and around the world. But where were they in 1861? We're content, but we still stand when the bands play Dixie!

[Page: H4951]
[TIME: 1230]

Another Ravenal entry:

 

SOUTHERN MEMORIAL DAY IN SOUTH CAROLINA (House of Representatives - May 09, 1989)
[Page: H1691]

(Mr. RAVENEL asked and was given permission to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)

Mr. RAVENEL. Mr. Speaker, today in South Carolina, it is Southern Memorial Day, the day we remember our Confederate dead. The following words, engraved in stone on the monument to the Confederate soldiers, which stands before our State House in Columbia, perfectly describes and salutes them:

These were men whom power could not corrupt, whom death could not terrify, whom defeat could not dishonor. Let their virtues plead for just judgment of the cause in which they perished. Let the South Carolinian of another generation remember that their State taught them how to live and how to die and that from her broken fortunes, she has preserved for her children the priceless treasure of their memories * * *.
 

 

 

Hagel, Chuck: U.S. Senator from Nebraska

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted for Ashcroft confirmation.

Huckabee, Mike: Governor of Arkansas

1.As reported in the Citizen Informer, the official publication of the Council of Conservative Citizens, www.cofcc.org,  Vol. 24, 1993 No. 3, page 1, as follows:

"Ark. Lt. Governor Mike Huckabee, unable to leave Arkansas by law because the Governor was absent from the state, sent a terrific videotape speech, which was viewed and extremely well received by the audience."

Though currently Huckabee is facing some CofCC hostility. http://arcofcc.freeservers.com/Documents/enaccc18.html

2. State has Confederate identified flag. On April 10, 1924, a forth large star, was placed alone towards the top of the diamond shape of the flag to represent the states association with the Confederacy. ("The Flag Book of the United States," by Whitney Smith, Revised Edition, 1975, page 110, Morrow Paperback editions.) The arrangement of the smaller stars in a diamond pattern is supposed to represent the fact that Arkansas has diamonds as a mineral resource. However, if you cut the flag in half and switch the pieces you get a sort of Confederate Battle flag, which I find interesting, but I have not yet seen any historical record supporting that the Arkansas state flag is a convert Confederate Battle flag. It might be in an archive somewhere in Arkansas.

 

McCain, John: U.S. Senator from Arizona

1. Vote on the Confirmation of Ashcroft for Attorney General 2001: (See Note 1) Voted for Ashcroft confirmation.

2. Voted for the extension of the Patent for the United Daughters of the Confederacy on both votes. (See Note 2)

3. The head of John McCain's campaign in South Carolina is the publisher of the Southern Partisan, Richard Quinn. The Southern Partisan is still being published and in its statement of circulation it lists Richard Quinn as the publisher.

4. As reported in the Washington Post, August 17, 2006, in an article by Jim Davenport, U.S. Sen. McCain has hired former South Carolina Attorney General Charlie Condon, as a co-chairman of his Straight Talk America PAC. With Condon being the co-chair, McCain really should rename it the Straight Talk Confederacy PAC.

Washington Post Article here.

Charlie Condon is the darling of Neo-Confederates and has been a outspoken defender of the Confederacy.

Update: I am going to put notes in here of the Condon material as I find it.


A. "Flag Defender Rises: Rebuttal by Attorney General Charles M. Condon to Governor David M. Beasley's Proposal to Remove South Carolina's Confederate Battleflag, Tues. Nov. 26, 1996," Southern Partisan, 3rd Quarter 1996, Vol. 16, pages 9-10.

B. Condon threaten to sue the NAACP when they did protests at the statelines asking visitors to boycott South Carolina. (Post and Courier, Jan. 29, 2002, page 1A, "Condon promises to sue NAACP over planned protests at border," SCHUYLER KROPF byline.

C. In the "CSA Today" section, of the Southern Partisan, under South Carolina, 4th Quarter, 2001, Vol. 21, hails Condon for a somewhat fanciful interpretation of a South Carolina law that he claimed entitled local Confederate groups to have a say in Confederate monument that were public property.
 


I am going to have to dig up Condon's material and put it on the Presidential 2008 webpage. I have this and that, will need to sort through it and come up with a summary of key points.
 

Pataki, George: Governor of New York

1. Pataki was the object of Neo-Confederate condemnation for his refusal to allow the Georgia state flag, which incorporated the Confederate Battle Flag, to fly in the New York State house in a display of state flags. In the Vol. 2, 1997 Confederate Veteran, official publication of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, (SCV), page 3, "Forward the Colors," is reported the following:

"In the northern hinterlands of New York, the Governor of New York, George Pataki, removed the Georgia State Flag, from a display of state flags, representing the original 13 colonies, in the New York capitol. The flag was removed due to protest, from a couple of New York assembly members, that the Georgia state flag incorporates the Confederate Battle Flag.

It is time to tell Governor Pataki that his actions are an affront to not just Georgians, but to all Southerners, We want the Georgia flag back up! "

The North Mississippi chapter of the Council of Conservative Citizen, www.cofcc.org , had a letter published in the Mississippi state papers attacking him when he came to a Mississippi Republican party function. Pataki, was also attacked by the League of the South (http://leagueofthesouth.net/index.php ) in their publication, Vol. 4 No. 2 March-April 1997, Southern Patriot, page 23.

 

Paul, Ron

Given recent events I am adding Ron Paul to this web page. He has an extensive record with the Neo-Confederate Ludwig von Mises Institute (LvMI) www.mises.org and actually attended a LvMI secession conference . Lew Rockwell the director of the Ludwig von Mises Institute runs www.lewrockwell.com also. You can visit their website and see what their opinion is of Ron Paul. I will have to spend an hour to get all his involvements on this page.

 

Tancredo, Tom: Republican U.S. House Representative of Colorado

He is talking about running. http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=50827

1. Tom Tancredo voted for House Resolution H.R. 121 which was a means by which the House Republicans avoided voting against the Council of Conservative Citizens, www.cofcc.org. The Democrats called for a resolution against the Council of Conservative Citizens after it was revealed that a great many Republicans were involved with the organization. The Republicans came up with a resolution against prejudice in general to avoid condemning the CofCC in particular. The National Review has an article which covers the episode in its review of Trent Lott's ill-fated comments at Thurmond's birthday. http://www.nationalreview.com/george/george121302.asp

1. Tom Tancredo at a League of the South event in South Carolina. Southern Poverty Law Center report. http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=706

 

 

Romney, Mitt: Governor of Massachusetts

1.

 

Third parties

1. There is a Neo-Confederate candidate, Donnie Kennedy, for the Presidency. http://www.libertybasedsociety.org/ . He and his brother, Ronald, Kennedy are the authors of the foundational books of the Neo-Confederate movement. They have a website http://www.kennedytwins.com in which you can read about their books.

2.Walter D. Kennedy has a Presidential campaign website. http://electwdkennedy.com/2007/march/announcement.php

notes

This section is for the explanatory notes for the above entries where necessary.

NOTE 1, ASHCROFT:

In January 2001 during the confirmation hearings of John Ashcroft for Attorney General the issue came up that Ashcroft had interviewed in the notorious Neo-Confederate publication, the Southern Partisan, 2nd Quarter 1998, starting on page 26.

The lead title for this interview was, "Senator John Ashcroft: Missouri's Champion of States' Rights and Traditional Southern Values." From the lead-in blurb:

"In his short time in Washington, Senator Ashcroft has already become known as a champion of state's rights and traditional values. He is also a jealous defender of national sovereignty against the New World Order. His bold leadership on these issues and others makes this Border State senator a natural for Southern Partisan."

Some excerpts from the interview:

Southern Partisan: I've met professor West and I read one of his earlier books, but not that one.

Senator Ashcroft: I wish I had another copy: I'd send it to you. I gave it away to a newspaper editor. West virtually disassembles all of these malicious attacks these revisionists have brought against our founders. Your magazine also helps set the record straight. You've got a heritage of doing that, of defending Southern Patriots like Lee, Jackson, and Davis. Traditionalists must do more. I've got to do more. We've all got to stand up and speak in this respect, or else we'll be taught that these people were giving their lives, subscribing their sacred fortunes and their honor to some perverted agenda.

Southern Partisan: A young lady in North Carolina sent home from school because she had a Confederate flag on her knapsack. What do you think about those kinds of incidents?

Senator Ashcroft: Well, you know, I was down in Texas the other day, and someone asked, "Where was Missouri in the Civil War?" I said, "Frankly, it was in Texas." After Fort Sumter, the legislature seceded, and they were run out when the federal troops came in and they set up a government in exile down in Texas.

The right of individuals to respect our history is a right that the politically correct crowd wants to eliminate, and this is just not acceptable. Take those history standards: the standards make no mention of Lee's military genius! I guess there's too much space devoted to Madonna.

After this part there is a lengthy section where Ashcroft explains how he is a defender of State's Rights.

NOTE 2: Extension of the Patent of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

On 7/22/1993, in the U.S. Senate, the Senate on a first vote, voted to extend the patent of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Carol Moseley-Brown made an impassioned speech and the vote of the Senate reversed itself and the patent was not extended. Since the votes were to table the measure, a vote "yea" is a vote against the Patent extension.

NOTE 3:

AFFIRMING THE CONGRESS' OPPOSITION TO ALL FORMS OF RACISM AND BIGOTRY (House of Representatives - March 23, 1999)

[Page: H1541]

Mr. GEKAS. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution (H.Res. 121) affirming the Congress' opposition to all forms of racism and bigotry.

The Clerk read as follows:

H. Res. 121

Whereas the United States of America has been enriched and strengthened by the diversity and mutual respect of its people;

Whereas the injustices and inequities of the past continue to demand our forceful commitment, both as individuals and as an institution, to equal justice under law and full opportunity for every American;

Whereas a racist attack upon any group of Americans is an affront to every one who cherishes the promise of America and the values that sustain our democracy; and

Whereas every Member of Congress has a responsibility to foster the best traditions and highest values of this nation: Now, therefore, be it
Resolved, That the House of Representatives--

(1) insists that no individual's rights are negotiable or open to compromise; and

(2) reaffirms the determination of all its Members to oppose any individuals or organizations which seek to divide Americans on the grounds of race, religion, or ethnic origin; and

(3) denounces all those who practice or promote racism, anti-Semitism, ethnic prejudice, or religious intolerance; and

(4) calls upon all Americans of good will to reject the forces of hatred and bigotry wherever and in whatever form they may be found.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gekas) and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Conyers) each will control 20 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gekas).

GENERAL LEAVE

Mr. GEKAS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks on H.Res. 121, the resolution under consideration.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Pennsylvania?

There was no objection.

Mr. GEKAS. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

(Mr. CONYERS asked and was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, this is an important matter before us. I want to commend the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Wexler) for causing this embarrassing substitute to be brought to bear. The scheduling and the substance of this resolution is an utter affront to all believers of civil rights and regular order in the House of Representatives. I appeal to every Member to vote against the underhanded processes involved in bringing H. Res. 121 to the floor this afternoon.

First, a word about bipartisan cooperation, since we have all come back from Hershey over the weekend. Without the courtesy of a simple phone call from the chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Hyde), this bill was discharged from the committee with no hearing, no markup; another example of how Committee on the Judiciary Democrats are still being treated unfairly at every turn of the process, not even a single phone call. The leadership continues to mistreat what is almost an equal number of Democrats as Republicans in the House.

Secondly, this bill, I think, is intended to be serious but it is really just a joke. A generalized, amorphous, meaningless resolution is an idea taken from the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Wexler) and is now so watered down as to be insulting.

It is a cover for those Republicans who do not want to condemn the Council of Conservative Citizens because so many Republican leaders have been associated with this racist group. They have cloaked themselves in mainstream conservatism, but it is masking an underlying racist agenda. Its leader is the former Midwest director of the White Citizens Council. Their web site reads like something out of the Third Reich.

What are we doing here today? I urge that the Members vote `no' on this resolution

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

The Speaker pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Canady) will control the 20 minutes on the majority side.

There was no objection.

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts).

Mr. WATTS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, hatred expressed through racial, religious or ethnic prejudice is an affront to the institutions of freedom, equal justice and individual rights that together form the bedrock of the American republic.

We need no reminder that bigotry lives on in America. The heinous murder of James Byrd, Jr., shocked us all with the graphic portrait of racism in its most vile form. So this resolution before us is not meant to be a mere reminder, nor is it meant to single out for condemnation any one organization or individual.

To be so particular would be to commit a crime of omission by giving a pass to other groups that espouse prejudiced, racist views, in effect saying that their bigotry is not so offensive as to be worthy of our condemnation. The Southern Poverty Law Center says that 537 hate groups exist in the United States. We cannot possibly condemn each bigoted organization, person or act individually.

In any event, there is a better course to take. Today we can make one sweeping statement of principle that acknowledges the existence of bigotry, condemns those who promote or practice it, and affirms the rights of individuals of all races, religions and ethnic backgrounds.

Passing this resolution will not reverse the horrible tragedy of James Byrd's death, nor will it directly prevent future tragedies of the same sort. It will not eliminate the more subtle but more common kind of bigotry that rears its ugly head every single day, like when a man gets on a subway, when a man of a certain color gets on a subway car and instinctively sits next to the person of his color instead of a person of another color; or when a Jewish family on the block is not fully accepted by some of their Protestant neighbors; or when a Hispanic kid walks into a store and is watched under a suspicious eye.

Let us also celebrate the great strides we have made as a Nation and as a people in moving toward a more unified America. Let us salute great men and women like Frederick Douglas and Rosa Parks and John Lewis and Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as the millions of others whose names we do not know but whose efforts have torn down many of the walls that far too long divided us.

Every American must keep working toward that goal of a hate-free America. So today, in this Chamber, let us stand and be counted. Today let us condemn all forms of racial, religious and ethnic prejudice.

Some will say this afternoon that because this resolution did not name a certain group, did not specifically name certain groups, that this resolution has no bearing. Why do we make racism and bigotry that small? What happens is that if someone names a certain group? Then someone else will offer a resolution to name another group, and then somebody will organize another resolution to name another group. What we get, Mr. Speaker, we get a tit for tat, we get an eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth.

Let me remind my colleagues what Dr. King said. He said when we have an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, it leaves America toothless and blind.

Let us carry on the fight for an America where Dr. King's dream can become a reality, an America where freedom rings crisply in the ears of every member of our national family, and an America where equal justice and equal opportunity are no longer mere goals but instead true hallmarks of our Nation's character. Please support this resolution.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 10 seconds.

Mr. Speaker, I say to my good friend, the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts), who could not join the organization that he is covering up for, the Council of Conservative Citizens, if he applied, that this is not tit for tat.

Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Wexler), a distinguished attorney and a member of the Committee on the Judiciary who caused the Republicans to bring this forward.

[Page: H1542]

Mr. WEXLER. Mr. Speaker, the resolution we are debating today is unfortunately nothing but a sham because it subverts the intent of the 147 Republican and Democratic cosponsors of the Wexler-Clyburn-Forbes resolution.

Our bipartisan resolution, House Resolution 35, was introduced seven weeks ago, and confronts head-on the ghosts of America's past, condemning the racism that has divided us as a Nation and exposing the insidious and hateful agenda of the Council of Conservative Citizens, the CCC.

The Watts resolution was introduced just Thursday. It has, I understand, no cosponsors. It confronts nothing. It was rushed to the floor today without committee consideration. The Watts resolution is designed only to derail our resolution and, if successful, hands the CCC an unconscionable victory.

Revealing the true identity of the Council of Conservative Citizens is the right thing to do. The CCC attempts to mask its hateful ideology by posing as a mainstream conservative organization, but the racist agenda of this group is undeniable. The CCC has directed its hatred towards millions of Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Jewish Americans, homosexuals, immigrants and virtually all minorities.

[TIME: 1530]

Listen, listen to what the leader of the CCC said about his group's strategy. I will replace his use of the N word with the word `blacks.'

`The Jews are going to fall from the inside, not from the outside, and the `blacks' will be a puppet on a string for us. The power is not out there in the gun, it is inside Congress. . .We've got to do it from the inside.'

The CCC is a wolf in sheep's clothing, and with racially motivated crimes on the rise, it is imperative that Congress go on record exposing them for the bigots they are. That is why the alternative resolution before us today is empty. It gives lip service to condemning racism, but it does not specifically cite the CCC, nor does it strengthen our civil rights laws. It does nothing real. It offers cover, not content.

In 1994 when this Congress voted overwhelmingly to condemn the racist, anti-Catholic, anti-Semitic speech of Khalid Abdul Muhammad of the Nation of Islam, there was no outcry about singling out one man for criticism. There was no rush to promote a generic statement about all racism, instead of identifying a specific and dangerous speech that had outraged millions of Americans.

So I guess what it all comes down to is that when it is a black person who is a racist it is okay for Congress to condemn him, but when it is a white person or a white group that is racist, then Congress does nothing, and we become, as the chairman, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Henry Hyde) said in 1994, accessories by silence, by inaction.

I respectfully urge Members to vote no on House Resolution 121. Let us bring House Resolution 35 to the floor for a meaningful vote.

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts).

Mr. WATTS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I would just say to my friend, the gentleman from Florida, that it is an amazing thing to me that over the last 4 years when I have been attacked, when I have had racist comments made about me, my friend from Florida never came to the floor and spoke up.

The gentleman from Michigan, when I have had racist attacks made against me by people in the white community back in Oklahoma, the State Democrat party back in Oklahoma, Slate magazine, which is a national magazine, no one ran to the floor to condemn that.

I think my resolution is much broader. My resolution condemns the New Order Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, the National Alliance, Aryan Nation, the CCC. Anybody that advocates these racist, bigoted, vile views is condemned in my resolution.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.

Mr. Speaker, I would let my good friend, the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts) know that I did not know he was attacked. If he was attacked in his home area, it was by right-wing zealots that may have been in the Council of Conservative Citizens.

But since the gentleman mentioned the names of these hate groups, why does the gentleman not put them in the resolution? Why do we not just debate them?

The gentleman spoke about no one came to his defense. I would have loved to have come to the defense of the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts).

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, House Resolution 121, which was introduced by the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts), affirms the opposition of the Congress to all forms of racism and bigotry. The resolution recognizes the grievous harm caused by racism, and emphasizes the responsibility of every Member of Congress to foster the best traditions and highest values of this Nation.

At the heart of the American experience is the ideal of respect for the dignity of the individual set forth in the Declaration of Independence. All men are created equal, and are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights.

This ideal has never been more eloquently expressed than by Dr. Martin Luther King, Junior. According to Dr. King, the image of God `is universally shared in equal portions by all men. There is no graded scale of essential worth. Every human being has etched in his personality the indelible stamp of the Creator. . . The worth of an individual does not lie in the measure of his intellect, his racial origin, or his social position. Human worth lies in relatedness to God. Whenever this is recognized, 'whiteness' and 'blackness' pass away as determinants in a relationship, and son and brother are substituted.'

Dr. King explicitly linked this view of man and woman created in the image of God to the philosophical foundation of the United States. This is what Dr. King says about the foundation of America:

`Its pillars were soundly grounded in the insights of our Judeo-Christian heritage: All men are made in the image of God; all men are brothers; all men are created equal; every man is heir to a legacy of dignity and worth; every man has rights that are neither conferred by nor derived from the state, they are God-given.'

These fundamental principles are at odds with any theory that distinctive human characteristics and abilities are determined by race. These principles condemn any effort to reduce individual human beings to the status of racial entities.

In this resolution, the House of Representatives recognizes that anyone, or any group, whether they are the Ku Klux Klan, the Aryan Nation, or the Council of Conservative Citizens, which fails to honor and respect these principles has attacked the very foundation of our Republic.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 13 seconds.

Mr. Speaker, as an original author of the Martin Luther King holiday bill, and one who worked and knew Dr. King, I am sure happy to see that at least the other side has been reading about King and have appropriate quotations to bring to this debate, falsely implying that he might not be supporting what we are trying to do.

The gentleman ought to name the organizations.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Michael Forbes), pointing out that he could not get time on the other side.

Mr. FORBES. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding time to me.

Mr. Speaker, the resolution before us belabors the obvious, that Congress is opposed to racism and hatred. The people watching this debate must be scratching their heads thinking, but surely this most American of all American institutions is already against racism and bigotry and the intolerant acts this that seek to divide us as a people.

Certainly an integral part of the charter of this place, it would seem evident, is our basic, unadulterated opposition to racism. So why this effort?

The resolution before us denounces `all those who practice or promote racism, anti-Semitism, ethnic prejudice, or religious intolerance.' It is a general statement by Congress against racism and bigotry, where a specific one is not only warranted but demanded.

The need for a swift and sure condemnation of the activities of a specific group, in this case the Council of Conservative Citizens, is necessary because under the cloak of portraying itself as a Main Street grass roots organization dedicated to conservative ideals, the CCC further attempted to legitimatize itself by having Members of Congress appear before the group. Where its words and its rhetoric would never render this hate group credible, they sought to have Members of this very institution legitimatize their very illegitimate behavior.

It is worth noting that Members have denounced the group's activities. The CCC has been noted as a direct outgrowth of the White Citizens Council of the fifties and sixties, known as the White-Collar Clan. A glance at their web site, as we have heard previously, shows they continue an allegiance to promoting anti-Semitic, racist rhetoric and ideas.

When an organization or a group such as the CCC attempts to misuse the good offices of those who are elected to represent all the people, the Congress does have an obligation, I believe, to take decisive action against such groups.

In 1994, it has been noted that the Congress swiftly dealt with the hate-mongering remarks of Khalid Muhammed when he appeared before Kean College. Three hundred and sixty-one to 34, his bigotry and hatred was denounced on the Floor of this very Chamber.

The matter before us restates an opposition to bigotry and hatred that should be evident. I might point out that later on, this body will also deal with a specific reference to anti-Semitic comments made by the members of the Russian Duma, so we do single out people when we feel they are wrong. Unfortunately, the resolution fails to repudiate an organization that sought legitimacy by involving Members of this great institution.

I would encourage reconsideration and allow House Resolution 35 to repudiate, as we hoped it would.

[Page: H1543]

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.

Mr. Speaker, I would respond to a couple of points made by the gentleman from Michigan.

In quoting Dr. King, I did not mean to imply that he would take one position or another in the controversy between the two sides here today. I simply quoted him for the fundamental proposition concerning the nature of racism and the nature of the political foundations of this country, and I believe that is something that all of us could agree on. I hope that we all would agree on it. I know that the gentleman from Michigan would agree with what Dr. King had to say, though he may disagree with the way it was used.

I would also point out that the gentleman from New York (Mr. Forbes) did not request time from this side, so the statement that the gentleman made that the gentleman from New York was unable to receive time from this side is simply untrue. If the gentleman had requested it, it would have been granted to him. No such request was made.

Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Barr).

Mr. BARR of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I thank the distinguished gentleman from Florida (Mr. Canady), the chairman of the Subcommittee on the Constitution, on which I am proud to serve, for yielding time to me.

Mr. Speaker, I think it is time to just maybe sit back, stand back, take a deep breath, and think a little bit about the many things that we have in common on both sides of the aisle, and practice what is far too frequently lacking in this Chamber and in the surrounding hallways, and that is a little bit of consistency.

Mr. Speaker, the Minority Leader, the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Gephardt) spoke on at least two occasions to a predecessor group of the CCC, associated therewith. He has since condemned groups such as the CCC, as I have and as I do. Yet, in those who rail against anybody who might have inadvertently spoken to this group, strangely silent is any criticism remotely similar to the criticism leveled at others if it just happens to be somebody on their side of the aisle.

So I would urge my colleagues on the other side of the aisle to practice a little consistency, both with regard to those people who might have spoken to such groups that we all have and always will condemn, as well as a little consistency with regard to those groups that we do condemn, such as the CCC.

Arguing that one person should be treated differently because of the color of their skin, the church in which they worship, the country of their birth, it always has been, on this side of the aisle and on that side of the aisle, and always will be wrong.

Our country fought a great Civil War, as a matter of fact, over such principles. Yet we still remain troubled today by a small number of Americans who persist in arguing against a color-blind society. Yes, those associated with and under the label of the CCC do that. We condemn them. I condemn them. I join my colleague from Florida in condemning them and my colleague from Michigan in condemning them.

I would certainly hope that they would believe in the sincerity of these remarks delivered in these hallowed halls by myself, the same as I have done in writing, just the same as they believe it when one of their colleagues condemns a group they might have spoken with, and found out later that they harbor views that are abhorrent to the minority leader, the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Gephardt), just as they are abhorrent to me.

[TIME: 1545]

So let us step back, practice a little bit of consistency, a little bit of fairness, and recognize that we have a great deal in common in supporting this resolution today.

Maybe it does not go as far as some Members would like, but I do think there is great merit in passing a resolution worded as the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts) has that goes far beyond simply condemning a specific group and being silent on other groups.

These matters are too important. We should support this. Condemn all racist views on whichever side of the political spectrum and put this matter to rest right now once and for all.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 3 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Clyburn), chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Mr. CLYBURN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Michigan for yielding me this time.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in opposition to this resolution, not because of what it says, but because of what it fails to say and because of the procedure which brings this resolution to the floor and what that procedure says to all Americans.

Mr. Speaker, we have heard Dr. King quoted here pretty often today. I would like to share with my colleagues another quote from Dr. King. Dr. King wrote, as he sat in the Birmingham city jail, that `we are going to be made to repent in this generation, not just for the vitriolic words and deeds of bad people, but for the appalling silence of good people.'

I think that this resolution is silent over what we are here to denounce today. It is fine for us to reaffirm the obvious, but I think that the Congress must now condemn the kind of rhetoric, the kind of ideas, the kinds of thoughts that are being enunciated by the Council of Conservative Citizens.

The gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts) has asked, why have we not defended him against certain similar instances. The fact of the matter is I do not remember the gentleman from Oklahoma defending me when the Council of Conservative Citizens attacked me in my last two campaigns. Probably he did not know I was attacked. Of course we did not know he was attacked either.

The fact is, though, we are here with 150 cosponsors with a resolution that we have asked to be brought to this floor to give all of us an opportunity to express our views on this group of people. We have not been granted that opportunity. I do not see where this resolution in any way takes away from what we are attempting to do.

So, Mr. Speaker, I believe that we should be today condemning specific expressions by a specific group, the Council of Conservative Citizens. I do not think that we can afford to ignore this kind of vile rhetoric in the climate in which we live, a climate of racial profiling, a climate of ethnic bashing, a climate of religious intolerance. It is time for us to speak up and stand up for those people that we are here to represent.

Mr. Speaker, I remember the words of Martin Niemoller of Germany who once wrote: In Germany, first they came for the Jews, and I did not speak up because I was not Jewish. Then they came for the Catholics. I did not speak up, because I was Protestant. Then they came for the trade unionists and the industrialists, and I did not speak up because I was not a member of either group. Finally, they came for me. And by that time, there was no one left to speak up.

[Page: H1544]

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Pickering).

Mr. PICKERING. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H. Res. 121, condemning hatred and bigotry in all forms. But I rise today with a certain amount of sadness about the nature of this debate. If my colleagues do not mind, I would like to talk in a personal way about my family and life experience as it comes to this issue and what my hope is for my service and my contribution to this body.

In 1963, the day I was born, my father was elected as county attorney in Jones County, Mississippi, one of the most violent and turbulent places in the country during the civil rights initiative. During that period of time, he testified against the Imperial Wizard of the KKK, Sam Bowers.

In 1968, because of his stand against the Klan and against the violence, and because he testified against Sam Bowers, he lost his next election. But I can tell my colleagues that, as his son, I am very proud of what he did during that time. He left me a rich legacy, an example of courage. I hope I can do the same for my five boys.

In 1969, my first grade class was the first to be integrated in Mississippi. I want to be part of a new generation that brings reconciliation among our races.

This debate today, I am afraid, is not about reconciliation, and it is not about unity. It is about dividing. It is about personal destruction. It is about partisan advantage.

I hope we can all step back and look not only at the objective of racial reconciliation and condemning all bigotry and all hatred, but to see it this way, that this House, that this body can come together in everything we do with a true goal, a true purpose of reconciliation, of unity. Then this country and this House will be a better place because of it.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 15 seconds.

Mr. Speaker, I was so moved by the gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Pickering). Could the gentleman from Mississippi explain how racial conciliation can come from the Council of Conservative Citizens, a racist group?

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Barrett).

Mr. BARRETT of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, we all know why we are here. We are here because of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a racist group. This resolution does not speak to that. It is silent. By its silence, it speaks volumes. It speaks volumes of this institution's refusal to confront racism.

The reason this institution refuses to confront racism is because it is uncomfortable for some Members here, and that is just too bad because, until we confront racism, it is going to continue. If we simply excuse it, whitewash it, apologize for it or ignore it, it is going to continue.

There is nothing wrong with the words in this resolution. They simply do not confront the real problem. I think it is ironic that on the same day that we have a resolution, in essence, condemning a member of the Duma for antisemitic comments that we do not do the same thing to confront racism in our own country. We are ready to condemn it in Russia, but we are not ready to condemn it here; and that is the tragedy of what we are doing today.

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts).

Mr. WATTS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, I would just say to the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Barrett) that I have felt racism. It is not fun. It is very uncomfortable.

So I would just say to the gentleman from Wisconsin, I believe I know his heart on this issue and I know that his motives are true or that they are in the right place, but we are talking about naming names. I would like for the gentleman from Wisconsin to name names as to who is uncomfortable with stating that racism is wrong.

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Gilman).

(Mr. GILMAN asked and was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)

Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding me this time.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to offer my support to H. Res. 121 denouncing all individuals and all organizations that would seek to perpetuate hate against any groups or individuals.

We are all aware that there has been a dramatic increase in the number of hate crimes perpetrated against minorities in the United States. Too often we hear in the news of acts of violence perpetrated against groups or individuals simply because of their race or ethnicity.

The recent incident in Jasper, Texas, resulting in the tragic death of James Byrd, remains a strong reminder that Congress needs to address these kind of crimes to ensure that those who commit them will be punished accordingly.

Many of us in the Congress who have witnessed such acts firsthand of bigotry, racism, and prejudice are deeply committed to doing all we can and all that is possible to diminish these acts committed by people who utilize prejudice to spread an agenda of hate among others simply because of differences of race, color, or creed that may exist between them.

The passage of this measure, H.R. 121, affirming the opposition of Congress to all forms of racism and bigotry, I think is an important first step toward recognizing such crimes as well as ensuring that at long last we may see the beginnings to an end of such unjust acts. Accordingly, I am pleased to lend my support to this measure and urge our colleagues to support it.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 seconds to the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Barrett).

Mr. BARRETT of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I want to respond to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts). He asked me to name names. I said the institution. I think that this institution has an obligation to come out against racism. That is the name I name.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Brown).

Ms. BROWN of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to the Watts resolution. This is just another example of the Republicans trying to have their cake and eat it too. On one hand, they claim to be against racism, but the Republican leadership refuses to condemn the Council of Conservative Citizens, or CCC, a modern-day KKK.

By killing a resolution condemning the racism and bigotry of the Council of Conservative Citizens, the Republican leadership denied itself the opportunity to attack the problem of racism.

House Resolution 35, of which I am an original cosponsor, has 142 cosponsors, including 13 Republicans, as well as the support of a broad base of civil rights leaders, religious organizations, and conservative activists. This has never been brought to the floor.

House Resolution 121, which was dropped last Friday, was rushed to the floor without even a single cosponsor and does not mention this terrible group. Fellows, if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it is a duck.

  •  
  • By killing a resolution condemning `the racism and bigotry espoused by the Council of Conservative Citizens,' the Republican leadership denied itself the opportunity to attack the problem of this new, more subtle kind of racism head on, the type sponsored by the Council of Conservative Citizens.
  • This is just another example of the Republicans trying to have their cake and eat it too. On one hand, they claim to be against racism and attack it, yet on the other, members of their leadership have ties to the CCC, which is in reality, a new form of the KKK. In fact, the CCC is an outgrowth of the abhorrent `White Citizens Council,' which helped enforce segregation in the 1950s and 1960s. With ties to the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist groups, the CCC promotes a blatantly racist agenda, while masking its true ideology by acting as a mainstream conservative organization. Indeed, I say that if it looks like duck, quacks like a duck, and walks like a duck, it is in fact, a duck.
  • I believe that House Resolution 121, which is merely a watered down version of House Resolution 35, was brought to the floor in order to shield the Republican party from criticism for their relationship with the Council of Conservative Citizens. Indeed, while House Resolution 35, which has 142 cosponsors, including 13 Republicans, as well as the support of a broad base of civil rights leaders, religious organizations, and conservative activists, was never brought to the House Floor. This resolution, which was dropped just last Friday, was rushed to the Floor without even a single cosponsor. I believe this is a completely inauthentic resolution, and is being utilized purely as a political ploy to blunt criticism of certain members of the Republican party for their affiliation with the Conservative Council.
[Page: H1545]

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from California (Mr. Dreier), chairman of the House Committee on Rules.

(Mr. DREIER asked and was given permission to revise and extend his remarks.)

Mr. DREIER. Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to join the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts) as a cosponsor of this important resolution condemning racism.

America was founded on the fundamental principle that God endowed each and every human being with an innate value and equality which stands above any man-made institution or authority.

This fundamental principle that human beings, with their rights and responsibilities, are the foundation upon which all good societies are built, is what has separated this great Nation from nearly every other civilization in history.

That said, we know human beings are flawed and that this country suffers from many of the same evils that we see tearing apart people and communities across the globe.

Racism divides us. Bigotry closes our minds and our hearts to others. Religious and ethnic intolerance eat away at our soul and reduce our humanity.

Therefore, we must repeat the message of racial and religious tolerance, not only to ourselves, but to our children who are the future.

We rise today unequivocally, not to state that our past is pure, not that we are without sin, not that we will not fail in the future, but that we will strive to live up to Abraham Lincoln's vision of America, `A nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.'

[TIME: 1600]

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 5 seconds to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Wexler).

Mr. WEXLER. Mr. Speaker, to clear the record the minority leader has not spoken to the Council of Conservative Citizens. His civil rights record is excellent and he is a sponsor of the resolution condemning the CCC.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Sheila Jackson-Lee), the dedicated civil rights and constitutional expert on the Committee on the Judiciary.

(Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas asked and was given permission to revise and extend her remarks.)

Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I thank the distinguished ranking member of the Committee on the Judiciary.

I imagine that the people of the United States are wondering what happens here? What have we wrought, Mr. Speaker? What have we brought about? We have our good friends, the Republicans, debating that they are against bigotry and racism, and I believe in their hearts and in their minds they are.

I had hoped, having visited the Gettysburg scene this past weekend, where the north and south rose up against each other, that we would come today on the floor of the House and join together as one voice against racism and bigotry, and that one voice is H.R. Resolution 35, the resolution by the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Wexler) and the gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Clyburn) that specifically denounces the CCC.

I ask my colleagues, why can we not come together as one to recognize that racism and bigotry is wrong? In this instance it is one organization that has gone against Jews in anti-Semitism, denigrating American leaders like Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King. We lose today the spirit of unity and the reflection that the United States Congress stands as one by putting 121 over 35.

I ask the leadership to please bring us together and vote for H.R. 35. Bring it to the floor. We are not angry, we want to be one. The CCC should be denounced.

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I would inquire of the Chair concerning the amount of time remaining on each side.

The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. LaHood). The gentleman Florida (Mr. Canady) has 1 1/2 minutes remaining, and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Conyers) has 1 minute and 35 seconds remaining.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of the time.

My colleagues, it can now be perceived that this bill is a ruse; that it is totally characteristic of Republicans who want civil rights on the cheap in a futile attempt to show the country that they are really not Neanderthals. But when it comes to real substance, they attack civil rights laws at nearly every turn. We do not need meaningless words. We want action. But when it comes to real action, the Republican Congress turns its back.

When we try to raise the problem of civil rights laws being enforced, they respond by repealing key antidiscrimination laws.

We see the horrors of hate crimes every day. Jasper, Texas. James Byrd as an example. But we cannot move on hate crimes legislation.

We raise problems of police brutality, the spraying of 41 bullets into an unarmed black man. The tragic cases of Abner Louima and Mr. Diablo. We get no response from the committee that has jurisdiction. We could not even get funds for a hearing or a stenographer in Brooklyn, New York.

So we try to fully fund enforcement of civil rights laws at the Justice Department, but the Republican members of the Committee on the Judiciary turn their backs on us. And now they ask us in good faith to support these words. We cannot do it, my colleagues.

Mr. Speaker, I urge the rejection of H. Res. 121.

Mr. CANADY of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts).

Mr. WATTS of Oklahoma. Mr. Speaker, again I repeat that hatred, expressed through racial, religious or ethnic prejudice, is an affront to the institutions of freedom, equal justice and individual rights that together form the bedrock of the American republic.

H. Res. 121 urges the House of Representatives to oppose all, A-L-L, all hate organizations, including the Council of Conservative Citizens and others. The New Order Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, the National Alliance, Aryan Nations, the National Association for the Advancement of White People, Knights of Freedom, and any other that would espouse the vile views that these organizations espouse needs to be rejected, and H. Res. 121 does that. I ask for its passage from my colleagues.

  •  
  • Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of my colleagues, Congressmen Wexler, Clyburn, and Forbes and urge the Speaker to pull H. Res. 121, which simply affirms Congress' opposition to all forms of racism and bigotry, and substitute for it H. Res. 35, which condemns specific acts and expressions of racism by specific individuals and groups such as the Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC). H. Res. 35 deals with an important issue that affects all Americans, regardless of race, gender or sexual orientation. We must denounce racism and bigotry because it is dividing our country. We cannot tolerate narrow-mindedness from anyone or any group.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! The Red Shirts, the Knights of the White Camellia, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Council of Conservative Citizens are all groups aimed at preventing equal protection under the law for all Americans--and we must denounce them specifically for their actions and their rhetoric.
  • The Ku Klux Klan was formed in 1866 and it was a secret body that soon reached throughout the South and part of the North. Some people formed the Ku Klux Klan to stop newly freed slaves from exercising their rights as citizens pursuant to the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! Traditionally. Klansmen, as they call themselves, were masked and dressed in white, and usually operated under a cover of darkness. But today, this group has traded its robe and hood for suits, ties and briefcases. They have traded their billboards for Internet websites, but we still know them because their rhetoric of hate remains the same.
  • Historically these groups have singled out all Negroes, Catholics, Jews, and foreigners that displease them by threats, whippings, setting fires or anything that will make their victim submit to the terroristic threats.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! This resolution will serve as notice that Congress condemns racism and that it has no place in an orderly society. The Constitution of the United States guarantees every citizen the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. A prosperous American must develop a mutual respect and tolerance of diversity.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! America is a nation of migrants. A mosaic of different cultures and traditions, and that's why this is a great nation. We can no longer remain silent on this important issue. We can no longer ignore the fact that specific groups, like the CCC and the KKK, exist in this society and do nothing but foster hatred for humankind.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! Everyone must pull together to stamp out hate and bitterness. The Twenty-first century is upon us--all of Europe is unifying in a cooperative effort to work together for financial synergy, and we here still deal with groups unwilling to acknowledge that segregation has ended.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! We must become a testimony for and nation, under God with liberty and justice of all. We must come together as Americans to make the pledge of allegiance a reality for everyone.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! Racism has no place in America--we must begin to move beyond the color line--put aside our racial differences--move our country forward. Red, Yellow, Black, or White we are all precious in God's sight.
  • We must denounce racism and bigotry! it is essential that we vote NO on H. Res. 121 and I urge the House Leadership to schedule H. Res. 35 for a floor vote. Congress must take an active role through legislation and publicly state that acts of racism and bigotry are divisive tools that are utilized by small groups, including the CCC, to prevent unity and harmony amongst Americans.
  • We must denounce groups that organize simply to disseminate messages harmful to our society. Congress must act, in unison, not only to condemn racism and bigotry, but also to condemn acts of racism and bigotry. I urge each of you to vote to support H. Res. 35.
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  • Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Mr. Speaker, I will not waste time denouncing the CCC. This organization has already been exposed as the racist, hate-mongering, bigoted group that we all know it to be.
  • H. Res. 121 was brought before this body today as an attempt to `whitewash' real, meaningful legislation that will condemn a specific group for specific acts. It is not the altruistic piece of legislation Members on the other side of the aisle want you to think it is. To the contrary, it is a prime example that the CCC has been successful in achieving its goal of infiltrating the United States Congress.
  • All of a sudden, the reasons given by Republicans for their 1994 denunciation of Kalhid Mohammed don't apply to this legislation. Even today, the Republicans have said it is acceptable to condemn the members of a Russian organization for making anti-Semitic statements, but they won't allow the House to take the same action against an American group that has attacked blacks, Latinos, immigrants, homosexuals, and Jews.
  • Republican actions warrant a specific question, `What is the problem with denouncing the blatantly racist actions of an American group that has its roots planted in the cesspool of racial separatism and white supremacy?'
  • Maybe the answer to this question lies in statements made by Gordon Baum, the national CEO of the CCC. I think it explains why Republicans, especially Southern Republicans, refuse to distance themselves from this group:
  • When Jim Nicholson, RNC Chairman, asked Republicans to distance themselves from the group, Baum said, `He doesn't know what he is talking about.'
  • Baum said that Nicholson is alienating key GOP voters: `The Wallace-Reagan Democrats are the ones who made the Republicans have enough votes to win. Without the Wallace-Reagan Democrats, the Republicans aren't going to have near the voting strength.'
  • Baum contended Nicholson and other party leaders `are doing a pretty good job running them [white, working-class voters] off * * * Sometimes it's remarkable how dumb they are. They let the liberal media run their campaigns. They apparently don't even know why these people vote Republicans half the time.
  • Lott recently has renounced the group, and Baum warned that the majority leader could pay a political price in his home State. `It could be [there will be a backlash]. If he keeps it up, if he keeps distancing himself from everything. A sizable segment knows the truth, that we are very much in tune with the people of Mississippi on most issues.'
  • Mr. Speaker, H. Res. 121 is deceptive. It is a distraction, and it is doomed for failure. Once the Republicans finish trying to pass this farce of a bill off on the American public, I have a fence they can use the rest of their white wash on. That's about the only thing its good for.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gekas) that the House suspend the rules and agree to the resolution, House Resolution 121.

The question was taken.

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I object to the vote on the ground that a quorum is not present and make the point of order that a quorum is not present.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Evidently a quorum is not present.

The Sergeant at Arms will notify absent Members.

The postponed votes on the three earlier suspensions will be voted on following this vote. This will be a 15-minute vote followed by three 5-minute votes.

The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 254, nays 152, answered `present' 24, not voting 4, as follows:

Roll No. 60

[Roll No. 60]

 

I am delighted to honor the United Daughters of the Confederacy as you celebrate your 100th anniversary.

One of the most rewarding of human experiences is the coming to gether of people to share common experiences and interests. For 100 years, the United Daughters of the Confederacy has maintained and built upon the wonderful legacy of your founders. The strength of your organization today is a testament of the vision of your founders and to your commitment to your shared goals.

I congratulate you on your achievement, and I extend best wishes for many years of continuing success.

Bill Clinton

I am delighted to honor the United Daughters of the Confederacy as you celebrate your 100th anniversary.

One of the most rewarding of human experiences is the coming to gether of people to share common experiences and interests. For 100 years, the United Daughters of the Confederacy has maintained and built upon the wonderful legacy of your founders. The strength of your organization today is a testament of the vision of your founders and to your commitment to your shared goals.

I congratulate you on your achievement, and I extend best wishes for many years of continuing success.

Bill Clinton

I am delighted to honor the United Daughters of the Confederacy as you celebrate your 100th anniversary.

One of the most rewarding of human experiences is the coming to gether of people to share common experiences and interests. For 100 years, the United Daughters of the Confederacy has maintained and built upon the wonderful legacy of your founders. The strength of your organization today is a testament of the vision of your founders and to your commitment to your shared goals.

I congratulate you on your achievement, and I extend best wishes for many years of continuing success.

Bill Clinton

NOTE 4:  Former president Bill Clinton's record.

1. Bill Clinton's Letters of Congratulations To the United Daughters of the Confederacy

Letter of June 21, 1994 from Bill Clinton to the United Daughters of the Confederacy printed on page 9 of the Sept. 1994 issue of  United Daughters of the Confederacy Magazine.

I am delighted to honor the United Daughters of the Confederacy as you celebrate your 100th anniversary.

One of the most rewarding of human experiences is the coming together of people to share common experiences and interests. For 100 years, the United Daughters of the Confederacy has maintained and built upon the wonderful legacy of your founders. The strength of your organization today is a testament of the vision of your founders and to your commitment to your shared goals.

I congratulate you on your achievement, and I extend best wishes for many years of continuing success.

Bill Clinton

 

Letter of September, 1994 from Bill Clinton to the United Daughters of the Confederacy printed on the inside of the front cover of the Feb. 1995 issue of United Daughters of the Confederacy Magazine.

I am delighted to honor the Georgia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy as you celebrate your 100th anniversary.

One of the most rewarding of human experiences is the coming to gether of people to share common experiences and interests. For 100 years, the Georgia Division has maintained and built upon the wonderful legacy of your founders. The strength of your organization today is a testament of the vision of your founders and to your commitment to your shared goals.

I congratulate you on your achievement, and I extend best wishes for many years of continuing success.

Bill Clinton

 

Letter of August 9, 1995 from Bill Clinton to the United Daughters of the Confederacy printed on the inside of the front cover of the Sept. 1995 issue of United Daughters of the Confederacy Magazine.

Greetings to everyone gathered in our nation's capital for the 1995 National Convention of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Congratulations on beginning of the second century of your organization -- your long history is a tribute to your dedication to and respect for the ideals of your founders.

This week marks a special time for the members of your organization to share memories, traditions, and goals. I hope that your visit to Washington is an enjoyable one and that your will take advantage of its unique beauty and many historical sites.

Best wishes to all for an enjoyable convention.

Bill Clinton

 

Letter to Bill Clinton by myself with my street address removed asking him to retract his letters of congratulations to the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

 July 15, 2000

Edward H. Sebesta

newtknight@mindspring.com

William Jefferson Clinton
President of the United States of America
White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, District of Columbia 20500

Dear President Clinton:

Recently in the news United States Senator of Arizona, John McCain apologized for his stand on the Confederate flag while campaigning in South Carolina. Texas Governor George W. Bush, recently took down two Confederate plaques off of the Texas Supreme Court building. If Republican leaders can give up the Confederacy, I am hoping you will find your way to giving up the Confederacy as well.

I am referring to your three letters of congratulations to the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) dated, June 21, 1994, September 1994, and August 9, 1995 and published in the UDC Magazine: Sept. '94, page 9; Feb. 1995, inside front cover; Sept. 1995, inside front cover. Your letters are online at <http://www.templeofdemocracy.com/BillClinton.htm> (copy enclosed).

Renowned Civil War historian James McPherson recently on the radio had this to say about the United Daughters of the Confederacy:

"I think, I agree 100% with Ed Sebesta about the motives or the hidden agenda, not too, not too deeply hidden I think of such groups as the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Sons of Confederate Veterans. They are dedicated to celebrating the Confederacy and rather thinly veiled support for white supremacy. And I think that also is the again not very deeply hidden agenda of the Confederate flag issue in several southern states." [Nov. 3, 1999, "Democracy Now" Pacifica Radio.]

I can amply document James McPherson's assertions at my webpage <http://www.templeofdemocracy.com/UDC.htm> (copy enclosed). You can read that the UDC thinks the Middle Passage in the slave trade wasn't really bad for Africans (copy enclosed).

I am asking you to publicly withdraw your letters of congratulations to the UDC. There is about a half year left in your Presidency, there is still time to leave office Confederate-free.

Sincerely Yours,

Edward H. Sebesta

 

2. Bill Clinton sent a wreath to the Confederate Monument in Arlington Cemetery while president each year.

 

 

general references

1. The SCV issued this press release concerning Democratic presidential candidates being against the Confederate flag. http://www.scv.org/press/scvpr08.htm

2. Council of Conservative Citizens in New Hampshire, http://newtknight.blogspot.com/2006/07/council-of-conservative-citizens-in.html They are organizing a chapter there.